If you aren't going to provide wireless service on Metrorail that actually works, then eliminate it altogether. I tried for 30 minutes this morning just to get past the initial login screen without success.

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Michael Saadeh over 5 years ago

I have tried over a hundred times over the past year and it never works! My crappy 3G service in the train is all that I can use. Wifi on the train would be amazing!! Please vote for this

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Lorraine x over 5 years ago

I agree don't advertise wireless that doesn't ever work..

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JohnMichael Vincent Cortez admin over 5 years ago

The wifi service is poor in some cases bcause it is being so heavily utilized by our passengers - it does work well, it just cannot handle the amount of demand. We have heard that more bandwidth is desired by many of our passengers, but to provide that would come at some expense. My understanding is that it is something on our list of things to explore for the future. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tragedy_of_the_commons - a good description of what is happening with the free on-board wifi

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Dan Keshet over 5 years ago

If it's so slow it's useless and too much of an expense to upgrade, why not charge for it? You could probably get the folks who administer airport wifi to pay you a fee to manage the authorization side of the network in exchange for a cut and I'm sure many daily commuters would spring for a monthly pass.

Obviously, people would prefer free to paid, but if the choice is between free and impossible to use, and paid and possible to use...

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Randy x over 5 years ago

It's funny we advertise that we are a big time tech city and still charge fees at the airport. What a shame. Do you know how many airports there are that is free? Lots. Even KC. And as busy as San Diego. Austin should be ashamed or quit thinking we are a big time player in the tech world. Imagine business people doing businss here. "What? I have yo pay?

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Iona x about 5 years ago

Would it be at all cost effective to simply block access to streaming data sites (pandora, netflix)? Would that at all improve the speed and reliability?

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Derek Jones about 5 years ago

@johnMichael Vincent Cortez - I might agree with you, if it actually worked well when I sometimes get on in the middle of the day; with 10 passengers or so (and 100% are likely not using it then), it's still marginal at best.  I have to strongly disagree.... It NEVER works 'very well.'

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Iona x about 5 years ago

It does work better when there are fewer people on the train. And it works better on the buses.

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Bob x about 5 years ago

I think that the position of the board is to say that they "have wireless" not that it actually works. Without a service level agreement that has effective key performance measures and performance indicators this will not work. Time to let ATT, Sprint or Verizon take over and compete with one another for our business even if it is a paid service.

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Iona x about 5 years ago

But all those businesses already are effectively competing in the sense that they market mobile hot spots.

I think everyone should get a certain amount of use for free, and then have to pay to use more data. I guess the question is would they make enough money to cover the costs of implementing such a system?

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Michael Saadeh almost 5 years ago

I agree with the original poster and I disagree with CapMetro's statement below:

"The wifi service is poor in some cases bcause it is being so heavily utilized by our passengers - it does work well, it just cannot handle the amount of demand"  -JohnMichael Vincent Cortez

I ride the train at off-peak times so I'm often the only one on the train and maybe one or two other people.  The wifi is still so worthless because it doesn't provide any meaningful bandwidth. I'm better off attempting to get a 3G signal into the metal shell of the train which is typically a great challenge. 

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David Wright almost 5 years ago

I think the problem is because they are using celluar wireless (like clear wireles internet which uses sprint's network) they run into areas with bad cell phone tower coverage (or areas that have lot of blockage such as trees). There's one area on rosewood ave that has bad phone signal even on the bus and as soon as you get out of that area you're back to 5 bars of phone signal, there's another area I pass through on 982/983 near mpack and 38th that has the same issue. if there's no and/or b ad celluar service then the internet on trains / buses won't work either. it also doesn't help that cap metro uses 3g internet which is pretty slow nowadays. cap metro needs to jump a few years ahead of time to catch up with the rest of us, 3g is soooo 3-4 years behind

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JohnMichael Vincent Cortez admin almost 5 years ago

Just announced at today's Capital Metro Board Meeting: CapMetro to pilot (on one rail train) improved WiFi for rail riders, better coverage & speed. Will hopefully be successfull and be implemented throughout system.

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Greg x about 4 years ago

Have there been any updates on this? I just started using the rail this week and was excited that I would be able to us Wifi so I could work/browse the internet to and from my job. Unfortunately I was extremely disappointed when I found out that I could barely get the Google homepage to load.

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Derek Jones about 4 years ago

They are currently 'testing' 4G/LTE on train 103. I've managed to ride it ONCE. It is very fast. Hopefully they will roll it out sooner than the promised 2014.

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Capital Metro admin about 4 years ago

We are currently piloting an improved wireless system on MetroRail unit 103. Feedback received has been overwhelmingly positive. If budget is available, Capital Metro may be able to expand this new capacity to other MetroRail trains, however it will have to compete with other critical capital needs of the agency. I encourage you to get involved in the development of Capital Metro's FIscal Year 2014 budget, which will kick-off in the next few weeks.

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Andrei Lubomudrov almost 4 years ago

What is the status of the improved wireless for the Red Line?

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Melissa Ayala admin over 3 years ago

Andrei, we have finished bench testing the new equipment and our goal is to complete installations of the new Wi-Fi system on all six MetroRail vehicles by the end of the calendar year. Our rail operations teams will begin the installations as soon as next week.

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Will Blank over 3 years ago

Thanks for upgrade the train at the expense of bus service. Way to go. Us serfs appreciate it.

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Robin x over 3 years ago

The irony is that McDonalds provides wifi to all customers. They don't charge more just for the access and you can actually get good reception.

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John Harris over 2 years ago

Is there any updates on the quality of the service? We are thinking about moving out to Leander. However, my wife is an accountant and would like to be able to logon reliably and start billing hours during the commute.

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Dora Smith over 2 years ago

I can't find where THE CAPITAL METRO WEB SITE BOTHERS TO TELL US HOW TO ACCESS THE BLOODY WI FI!

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Dora Smith over 2 years ago

I've been using my notebook computer on the 801 bus. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. Today it cut in and out - every two minutes.

Customer service seem to lack heads. I had one woman scream at me that they'd insisted to her that the bus network HAS no SSID! I don't think so! Unfortunately the broadcom card on my old notebook doesn't interact well with Linux and it would only find hte network when I told it what the name of the network is . I'm lucky Ms. Screamer got off the bus and then someone else would tell me what the SSID is. But honestly, that woman's experience is all too typical of Capital Metro customer service. I'm not having trouble believing she was actually told that.

Connecting is unecessarily hard, in ways not connected to my system's quirks. For instance, you finally connect, and you have to open a browser to agree to Capital Metro's terms, when all you want to do is read your Kindle program - completely unecessary. But it gets better. The first time the page loads it has small print and a little OK icon. You have to go to an Internet page and then the same page opens again with BIG text this time, and a BIG OK icon, and then you click on it, and suddenly you've got... a web page? Not hardly. You've got Capital Metro's web site. For sure the whole thing was designed by a Capital Metro engineer.

Now. Can someone please tell me where on the bus the signal is the strongest. The router is at a specific location on that bus. I'm sure it would be expecting WAY too much to think customer service is going to come up with it - and the bus drivers don't know the first thing about it.

If Capital Metro is advertising wireless service and it doesn't work, and their answer is that we might consider upgrading to service that does work on an experimental basis, it seems to me I ought to be writing the state attorney general consumer fraud unit's office.

3/4G is definitely NOT going to work, because only certain devices from some other planet can use it, and usually not all that well, and the owners of those devices all have data plans and usually use it, because they usually have to.

Some of us are earthlings, with actual COMPUTERS, and they ain't going to connect to no 3 G!

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